Prince Harry's biggest revelations from his and Oprah's mental health series 'The Me You Can't See'

By Heather Cichowski and Zach Harper, with files from Ainhoa Barcelona

Prince Harry's biggest revelations from his and Oprah's mental health series 'The Me You Can't See'


Prince Harry and Oprah Winfrey's mental health documentary series, The Me You Can't See, was released on Apple on May 21. The compelling show encourages people to share their stories and have honest and open conversations about mental health.

Harry has always been passionate about mental health and breaking the stigma around issues related to mental well-being, and he did quite a lot of that in the series. He made some surprising, candid and very emotional revelations about what led him to get help, the panic attacks he was experiencing, how Princess Diana's death affected him and much more.

Read for some of his most moving remarks from The Me You Can't See.

Why he started therapy

The Duke of Sussex said a fight with his then-girlfriend Duchess Meghan made him get very serious about seeking professional treatment. He also revealed he had spent time seeking out different treatments before, but knew he had to make a change.

"I saw GPs. I saw doctors. I saw therapists. I saw alternative therapists. I saw all sorts of people, but it was meeting and being with Meghan," Harry explained. "I knew that if I didn't do the therapy and fix myself that I was going to lose this woman who I could see spending the rest of my life with."

Harry added that there was "a lot of learning right at the beginning" of his relationship with Meghan.

When she said, 'I think you need to see someone,' it was in reaction to an argument that we had. And in that argument not knowing about it, I reverted back to 12-year-old Harry."

Panic attacks and anxiety were among his struggles

In 2017, Harry told Bryony Gordon of The Telegraph about how his mother's death affected him. In The Me You Can't See, he shared that he experienced panic attacks and anxiety from ages 28 to 32, which he described as the most difficult period of his life.

"I would just start sweating. I would feel as though my body temperature was two or three degrees warmer than everybody else in the room," the duke recalled. "I would convince myself that my face was bright red and therefore everybody could see how I was feeling, but no one would know why, so it was embarrassing.

"You get in your head about it and then you're just like, 'Everybody's looking at me.' One bead of sweat feels like the whole face is pouring down. Just sweating, and then just all in my head going, 'This is so embarrassing. What are they thinking of me? They have no idea. I can't tell them.'"

Harry, Prince William and Duchess Kate founded the Heads Together mental health campaign in 2017. Photo: © Nicky J. Sims/Getty Images for Royal Foundation

Harry revealed he struggled with his drinking at this time as he turned to it as a way to mask emotions he was feeling.

"But I slowly became aware that, okay, I wasn't drinking Monday to Friday, but I would probably drink a week's worth in one day on a Friday or a Saturday night," he heartbreakingly shared. "And I would find myself drinking not because I was enjoying it but because I was trying to mask something."

How therapy changed his life

In one of Harry's first sessions, he revealed his therapist told him he was describing something that made him sound like he was "reverting to 12-year-old Harry." That's the age he was when his mother died.

"I felt somewhat ashamed and defensive," Harry emotionally shared. "She said, 'I'm not calling you a child. I'm expressing sympathy and empathy for you for what happened to you when you were a child. You never processed it."

He added that his therapist told him the result was those emotions were surfacing in different ways, being worked out through projections.

In one part of the series, Harry is filmed doing EDMR ( Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing) therapy on camera. It is a treatment that experts say can help people cope and process emotions from traumatic experiences.

Harry and Diana in Spain in 1987. Photo: © Tim Graham Photo Library via Getty Images

"Therapy has equipped me to be able to take on anything," Harry shared about how his life has changed since. "That's why I'm here now. That's why my wife is here now," he revealed. "Without therapy and without doing the work, we would not be able to withstand this. I've never had any anger through this, I've always had compassion. I'm now more comfortable in my own skin. I don't get panic attacks.

"I've learned more about myself in the last four years than I have in the 32 years before that. And I have my wife to thank for that."

Harry added that cameras do still upset him.

"The clicking of cameras and the flashes of the cameras makes my blood boil," the 36-year-old stated. "It makes me angry and takes me back to what happened to my mom and what I experienced as a kid."

"Grandma"

In a bittersweet moment, Harry opened up about one of Archie's first words: grandma. The little boy was referring to Diana, not Doria Ragland, Meghan's mother.

"I got a photo of her in his nursery, and it was one of the first words that he said — apart from 'mama,' 'papa,' it was then 'grandma.' Grandma Diana," Harry said of his son. "It's the sweetest thing, but at the same time, it makes me really sad because she should be here."

Harry, Meghan and Archie in South Africa in 2019. Photo: © Toby Melville/Pool/Samir Hussein/WireImage

The 36-year-old previously discussed how one of Archie's first words was "crocodile" during an interview on The Late Late Show with James Corden in February 2021.

Harry added while he misses his mother every day, he thinks she would be very happy for him and Meghan and their soon-to-be family of four.

"I have no doubt that my mom would be incredibly proud of me," he said. "I'm living the life that she wanted to live for herself, living the life that she wanted us to be able to live.

"So not only do I know that she's incredibly proud of me, but that she's helped me get here. And I've never felt her presence more as I have done over the last year."

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